David McCooey launches Jo Langdon’s ‘Glass Life’

‘One of the strengths of Glass Life is that it evokes both a rich worldliness and an intense sense of the local. Like so many of her peers, Jo’s poetry is very much a transnational one, showing that when it comes to creativity, national borders are largely irrelevant. This collection beautifully represents the poet inhabiting both a Northern world (European, cold, distant) and a Southern World (Australian, warm, nearby).’

Thanks to David McCooey for his wonderful launch speech, the full text of which can be read here.

Glass Life can be purchased here.

Alex Skovron launches Gayelene Carbis’s ‘Anecdotal Evidence’

‘[A] particularly personal, indeed intimate book, by turns playful, poignant, hilarious, nostalgic, brisk, effusive, wry, fragile, intricate, sexy, ironic, scathing, loving—and occasionally all of these at once. The language is deceptively free-flowing and conversational, propelled by a lively intelligence and a distinctive, sometimes barbed wit, but allied with a discipline of craft and a toughness of psychological insight’

Alex Skovron’s excellent launch speech can be read in full here.

Anecdotal Evidence can be purchased here.

David McCooey launches John Kinsella’s ‘Graphology Poems’

‘”Graphology” puts in train any number of Kinsella-esque concerns: identity, authenticity, memory, place, representation, power, and textuality itself. Facsimiles of handwriting, doodles, and even scribble, can be found in these pages, but even more notable, more ‘telling’, are the poetic images of the vast material history of writing found here.’

Thanks to David McCooey for his wonderful launch speech, the full text of which can be read here.

Graphology Poems: 1995–2015 can be purchased here.

Lisa Gorton launches Robyn Rowland’s ‘This Intimate War’

‘No poem can change the past. But a poem, if it is strong enough, can change the way in which we remember the past – our own, or our culture’s. It can change the kinds of facts that we notice. And when it changes the kinds of facts that we notice in the past, it changes the present, too.’

Lisa Gorton’s brilliant launch speech, published in Rochford Street Review, can be read in full here.

This Intimate War can be purchased here.